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The meaning of percent

Let's think about what percent really means by looking at a 10 by 10 grid. Created by Sal Khan and Monterey Institute for Technology and Education.

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  • leaf green style avatar for user yris.erin
    how do i solve this kind of problems: how much percent does 13 represent of an amount of 200. i understand its something as 200=100%, so 13=x% and in general, n=100%, then n-m=x%. thanks, please anyone soon! cheers.
    (190 votes)
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    • scuttlebug yellow style avatar for user Reina.Kuwahara
      Well, if it is a multiple of 100 (200 is, let's call it x) you just multiply it, however, many times it takes to get to x. You multiply 100 by 2(let's call 2 y) to get 200, so you multiply 13 times y(2).

      Hope this helped. If x is not a multiple of 100, then do what I commented on another question:

      Well, I am not Sal, but this is what I'd do for a whole number percent (something like 6% or 85%, not 8.7%) Divide the number that you want to 'percent' by 100. Then, take the percent (the 6 or 85) and the answer and multiply the hundredth and it together. There is your answer. (Please remember not to round and multiplying by .01 or dividing by 100 is just moving the decimal 2 places to the left.
      (16 votes)
  • orange juice squid orange style avatar for user emischler
    What exactly is happening at ?
    (21 votes)
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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user cherina.dominguez
    How can you make percents easier to understand and make it less confusing? It there any tip, tricks, helpful suggestions, and shortcuts to learning percents in a simpler way? Please answer this question, that everyone is dying to know! :)
    (9 votes)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user project7274
      As everyone mentions 'per cent' means 'per hundred'. Say for ex, you have scored 80% in your exam, it clearly states you have got 80 marks out of total 100 marks. Suppose, the test is for 50 marks only, and you have got 25 marks out of 50, which is 25/50.

      Now, if i want to find my percentage mark all i have to do is 25/50x2/2. (To make the denominator as 100, you have to multiply, both numerator and denominator with the same number(( in this ex, i have multiplied with 2)), which makes the DENOMINATOR ALONE as 100). So the resulting percentage is 50%.
      (16 votes)
  • orange juice squid orange style avatar for user Isabelle
    per cent means per 100 so 30% is 30/100 right?
    (12 votes)
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  • piceratops tree style avatar for user Jo21Mixels
    Is a percent in anyway related to a ratio?
    (9 votes)
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  • hopper cool style avatar for user Partha Sarker
    How will you know what percent a number will be if the number is something like 40 out of a number that isn't 100?
    (7 votes)
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  • hopper happy style avatar for user Kimi
    what is 12 percent of 123
    (8 votes)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user Elod B.
      Rocket Skywalker got the answer but it's rounded two only 2 decimals, to have more decimals it would be: 9.75609756097561 It is just repeating the numbers ^, how you would calculate this with a calculator would be (12 / 123) * 100.
      (3 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user liliana60006638
    What is the answer to a problem with a number bigger that 100 does it still go on top of 100?
    (5 votes)
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  • purple pi purple style avatar for user louisaandgreta
    Is 0.4% the same as saying 4 tenths of 1 percent?

    And if so, doesn’t that algebraically translate to: (4/10) times (1/100)?
    But that gives us 0.004
    (7 votes)
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  • male robot donald style avatar for user jamus.carneyhan
    how do i solve a problem with a to in it like divide 4 to 400.
    (6 votes)
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Video transcript

We're asked to shade 20% of the square below. Before doing that, let's just even think about what percent means. Let me just rewrite it. 20% is equal to-- I'm just writing it out as a word-- 20 percent, which literally means 20 per cent. And if you're familiar with the word century, you might already know that cent comes from the Latin for the word hundred. This literally means you can take cent, and that literally means 100. So this is the same thing as 20 per 100. If you want to shade 20%, that means, if you break up the square into 100 pieces, we want to shade 20 of them. 20 per 100. So how many squares have they drawn here? So if we go horizontally right here, we have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten squares. If we go vertically, we have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. So this is a 10 by 10 square. So it has 100 squares here. Another way to say it is that this larger square-- I guess that's the square that they're talking about. This larger square is a broken up into 100 smaller squares, so it's already broken up into the 100. So if we want to shade 20% of that, we need to shade 20 of every 100 squares that it is broken into. So with this, we'll just literally shade in 20 squares. So let me just do one. So if I just do one square, just like that, I have just shaded 1 per 100 of the squares. 100 out of 100 would be the whole. I've shaded one of them. That one square by itself would be 1% of the entire square. If I were to shade another one, if I were to shade that and that, then those two combined, that's 2% of the entire square. It's literally 2 per 100, where 100 would be the entire square. If we wanted to do 20, we do one, two, three, four-- if we shade this entire row, that will be 10%, right? One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. And we want to do 20, so that'll be one more row. So I can shade in this whole other row right here. And then I would have shaded in 20 of the 100 squares. Or another way of thinking about it, if you take this larger square, divide it into 100 equal pieces, I've shaded in 20 per 100, or 20%, of the entire larger square. Hopefully, that makes sense.