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Interpreting two-way tables

AP.STATS:
UNC‑1 (EU)
,
UNC‑1.P (LO)
,
UNC‑1.P.3 (EK)
CCSS.Math: ,
Learn how to read two-way tables.

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  • hopper cool style avatar for user BenR
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but, if 52% of Men voted for Romney, and 43% of women did, that would make 95% as a total. Whereas, Obama only got 94%. How does that make Obama win?
    (33 votes)
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  • male robot hal style avatar for user graciasjaden12
    I am having a hard time with interpreting two way tables. In some of the questions there are like 2 or 3 right answers to choose. i don't understand how to single out one of the choices to get the right answer. plz help.
    (16 votes)
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  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user aasimjessa
    Does relative frequency have to be a decimal or can it be a fraction? I've seen people do it different ways, but I'm not sure if that is the proper way?
    (14 votes)
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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user ESPERANCIA376
    Okay but i still don't understand the difference between the column and row relative frequency
    (9 votes)
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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user Awale mohamed
    Sal says that if you were to pick a man there is 52% chance they voted for Romney which i think is a mistake because this 52% is only on the population who voted for Romney not the general population who voted for both candidates other wise less than 10% will be left for the actual winner of the election Obama. so kindly correct it or correct me.
    (4 votes)
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  • winston baby style avatar for user Geemobaby
    Anyone know Obama's last name?
    (2 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Jesse
    I've been getting the following feedback a lot during the exercises: "We only know the column relative frequencies, not the row relative frequencies, so we cannot make this claim." Wouldn't that apply to this video as well?
    (2 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user JULIAN512
    Does relative frequency have to be a decimal or can it be a fraction? I've seen people do it different ways, but I'm not sure if that is the proper way?
    (2 votes)
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  • sneak peak green style avatar for user Robert Zak
    The practice problems are a lot more harder & difficult to calculate than this.
    (3 votes)
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  • hopper cool style avatar for user Dhaval Furia
    At , Sal says there are a couple of ways you can think about the problem.
    He only gives one way.
    What are the other ways ?
    (5 votes)
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Video transcript

- The two-way table of column relative frequencies below shows data on gender and voting preferences during the 2012 United States presidential election. They give us all this data. They give us this, as they say, the two-way table of column relative frequencies. So for example this column right over here is Men. The column total is 1.00, or you could say 100 percent. And we can see that 0.42 of the Men or 42 percent of the Men voted for Obama. We can see 52% of the Men or 0.52 of the Men voted for Romney. And we can see that the Other, neither Obama, 6 percent went for neither Obama nor Romney. And for Women, 52 percent went for Obama, 43 percent went for Romney and 5 percent went for Other. And then these, this 52 plus 43 plus 5 will add up to 100 percent of the women. During the 2012 United States presidential election, were male voters more likely to vote for Romney than female voters? So let's see. If we, there are a couple of ways you could think about it. Well, actually, let's go this way. Male voters, if you were a man, 52 percent of them voted for Romney. While for the Women, 43 percent of them voted for Romney. So a man was more likely. If you randomly picked a man who voted, there was a 52 percent chance they voted for Romney, while if you randomly picked a woman, there was a 43 percent, of women who voted, there was a 43 percent chance that she voted for Romney. So yes, male voters were more likely to vote for Romney than female voters. So the answer is Yes. And we're done.