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Graphing proportional relationships from a table

Sal graphs the equation of a line that represents a proportional relationship given a table. Created by Sal Khan.

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  • starky sapling style avatar for user sgomez66
    guys i don't know how to graph still is that imbaressing?
    (8 votes)
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    • winston baby style avatar for user mad moustache
      NO. It is not embarrassing. Graphing points is a simple thing to do. When you have a pair of coordinates, the first number is the X axis and the second number is the Y axis. To remember which number goes with what axes, just remember that X comes before Y in the alphabet. On the graph, each axes will have numbers on it. The number on the pair of coordinates, corresponds to the number on the graph. For example: A random pair coordinates that was given was (9,2). The fist number is the X axis and the value is nine. I find number 9 on the X axis and wait there. The second number is 2, so from the 9 go up to the 2 on the Y axis. One you place to dot, you are done.
      (8 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Kendra Beals
    Am I the only one who watched the video like ten
    times.
    (11 votes)
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  • cacteye green style avatar for user ashton anderson
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    (4 votes)
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  • primosaur seed style avatar for user taylorbug0778
    i thought slope intercept from was y=mx+b
    (2 votes)
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  • duskpin seedling style avatar for user Brightwellzane
    what if my table dose not have integer values for both coordinates how do i graph them.
    (3 votes)
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    • female robot grace style avatar for user Meryem Vera
      If you have x=0.4 and y= 0.8 for example, you can subtract both of them with a number that will make them integers. You can use 5 in this case, because when you subtract 0.4 with 5, it's 2, and when you subtract 0.8 with 5, it 's 4. And so, you would have two integers.
      (2 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user tenzink25
    could you guys not do the soo simple ones do ones that are a bit more complicated cause this one doesn't help at all I always get 4.8 never a perfect whole number like 1 5 or 6
    (2 votes)
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  • female robot grace style avatar for user Kamm3z
    Can a relationship be proportion if the slope negative or positive and will the slope be the same or different?
    (2 votes)
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  • starky seedling style avatar for user DBZFanBoy78
    When I do the same type of problem the same way, mine turns out wrong. Is Khan Academy bugged?
    (1 vote)
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  • hopper cool style avatar for user Liuxiuqi
    Why is Y first if we usually write X first? Did a random person just decide that or is there a deeper meaning here?
    (1 vote)
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    • mr pants purple style avatar for user The Purple Bear
      Y is first because we usually right equations like this...
      a=b+c
      When writing equations, it's considered best practice to put the variable we are defining, on the left side of the = sign. however, it does not change the meaning of the equation if we have b+c=a
      (2 votes)
  • hopper cool style avatar for user Liuxiuqi
    When Y is 0, X is also 0, so technically 0/0=1/6? Wut?
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

We're asked to graph the proportional relationship shown in the table below. And they give us a table of x values, and the corresponding y values. So we see when x is equal to 0, y is equal to 0. Then they give us a bunch of other points. When x is 3, y is 0.5. When x is 6, y is 1, so on and so forth. So let's graph one of these that actually have integer values for both coordinates. So when x is 6, y is 1. So we only need two points to specify the line. So we've actually graphed it. But then they also ask us, what is the slope of this line? And we just have to remind ourselves. Our slope is what is our change in y for a given change in x. So, for example, or another way to think about it, what is your change in y over your change in x? So here, our x changed by 6. It went from 0 to 6. And our y changed by 1. So our change in y over our change in x, which is the definition of slope, our change in y is 1, when our change in x is 6. See that right over here. Change in y, 1 when our change in x is 6. Let's check our answer. We got it right.