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Exponents of decimals

Exponents of decimals can be calculated by multiplying the decimal number by itself as many times as the exponent indicates. When multiplying decimals, count the total number of digits to the right of the decimal points in both numbers and place the same number of digits to the right of the decimal point in the product.

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  • piceratops seed style avatar for user davion  t
    how do you do 10 to the 12 power
    (14 votes)
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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user Yellow Top White Knot
    At the end of the video sals says another way to think about it is "9 tenths of 9 tenths is 81 hundreths"

    But isn't 0.9/0.9 = 1?
    (7 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user shueytravis5454
    0.9 x 0.9= 0.81? I see the math and understand how it is done. But 0.81 is smaller than 0.90? How does a bigger number (0.9) multiplied by itself ended up being smaller?
    (11 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Christine Queen
    A lot of the time when I'm stuck on an equation I tend to watch the video a few times and sometimes it still doesn't help because the person on the video does a lot of the math in their head and that's where it loses me is there any way for me to get one-on-one help?
    (8 votes)
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    • leaf orange style avatar for user hyunjinsong5
      Hi Christine,
      Yes, I have that problem sometimes too. Sal (in the voiceover) usually does the mental math faster than we can catch up. Unfortunately there is no feature here that you can get one-on-one help. (or not that I know of)

      What I would suggest it to pause the video and try to do the math yourself on a piece of paper or in your head. If you don't get that math, you could try searching up how to do it here on Khan Academy.
      (10 votes)
  • piceratops seedling style avatar for user Ablyss
    I really hate how he doesn't fully explain why you don't add the same amount of zeros to the second example here. You moved the decimal two spots to get 0.04 after multiplying 0.2 x 0.2. But why don't you do that for 0.9?
    (5 votes)
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    • stelly blue style avatar for user Kim Seidel
      You need to count decimal places needed. In both cases, the numbers being multiplied have 1 decimal place. 1+1 = 2 decimal places in your answer.
      2x2 = 4
      Since this is one digit, you need to put a zero in front of the 4 to create the 2 decimal place: 0.04

      9x9 = 81
      This is already a 2 digit number. So, the decimal point goes in front of the 8: 0.81

      Note: This is no different then if you multiplied 0.2 x 0.12
      There are 3 decimal digits. So, the answer becomes 0.024

      You may find it helpful to review the lessons on multiplying decimal numbers.
      (14 votes)
  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user H4MZ4 N3R
    What is 0 to the power of 0?
    (7 votes)
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  • piceratops tree style avatar for user AVERYM
    Im so confused even after the video :(
    (3 votes)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user ian.k.baah
      Hello! Greetings to you, and I'd be happy to explain exponents of decimals to you like.

      So, have you heard of exponents before? They are a way of showing repeated multiplication. But what happens when we have decimals in exponents? Well, let me explain!

      When we have a decimal number raised to an exponent, it means we need to multiply that decimal by itself the number of times shown in the exponent. For example, let's say we have the number 0.5 raised to the power of 3.

      To make it easier, we can read it as "0.5 to the power of 3." It means we have to multiply 0.5 by itself three times: 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5. When we do the math, we get 0.125.

      So, 0.5 raised to the power of 3 equals 0.125. It's like saying "0.5 times 0.5 times 0.5 gives us 0.125."

      This works the same way for any decimal raised to an exponent. You just multiply the decimal by itself the number of times in the exponent. It helps us calculate and figure out the value of these numbers quickly.


      I hope this helps! (^V^)
      (8 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user Yes We Can Do It!!!
    how do you use a exponent when using a fraction, for example (2/5) and 3 is a exponent.
    (5 votes)
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  • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user sacarazumba02
    has anybody else realized that if you look at the times tables for nine, the left side is counting up and the right side is counting down?
    (5 votes)
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  • female robot grace style avatar for user Arianna Covarrubias
    what is 24 to the power of 5
    (4 votes)
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    • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user Peyton Bennett
      Sorry, but I can not just give you the answer so I will tell you how to get the answer so you can also write out 24 to the power of 5 like this "24 Times 24 times 24 times 24 times 24 =" so exponents are pretty much multiplying one number as many times as the exponent says to. I hope this helped.
      (4 votes)

Video transcript

- [Instructor] What we're going to do in this video is get some practice evaluating exponents of decimals. So let's say that I have 0.2 to the third power. Pause this video, see if you can figure out what that is going to be. Well, this would just mean that if I take something to the third power, that means I take three of that number and I multiply them together. So it's 0.2 times 0.2 times 0.2. Well, what is this going to be equal to? Well, if I take 0.2 times 0.2, that is going to be 0.04. One way to think about it, two times two is four and then I have one number behind the decimal to the right of the decimal here. I have another digit to the right of the decimal right over here, so my product is going to have two digits to the right of the decimal, so it'd be 0.04. And then if I were to multiply that times 0.2, so if I were to multiply that together what is that going to be equal to? Well, four times two is equal to eight and now I have one, two, three numbers to the right of the decimal point, so my product is going to have one, two, three numbers to the right of the decimal point. So now that we've had a little bit of practice with that, let's do another example. So let's say that I were to ask you, what is 0.9 squared? Pause this video and see if you can figure that out. All right, well this is just going to be 0.9 times 0.9. And what's that going to be equal to? Well, you could just say nine times nine is going to be equal to 81, and so, let's see, in the two numbers that I'm multiplying I have a total of one, two numbers, or two digits, to the right of the decimal point so my answer's going to have one, two digits to the right of the decimal point. So put the decimal right over there and I'll put the zero, so 0.81. Another way to think about it is nine-tenths of nine-tenths is 81 hundredths, but there you go. Using exponents, or taking exponents of decimals is the same as when we're taking it of integers. It's just in this case you just have to do a little bit of decimal multiplication.