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Measuring angles using a protractor 2

Sal measures several angles with a protractor. Created by Sal Khan.

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  • spunky sam blue style avatar for user Madison
    How are angles used in everyday life?
    (71 votes)
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  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user Kamiyah.Hinton
    Is there a angle greater than 360 degrees?
    (13 votes)
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  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user Madalynn Ramon
    how come u can move the protractor on that lesson but mine glitches when i try to move the protractor. [please vote for me i need 10 or more votes to get a badges]
    (17 votes)
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  • piceratops tree style avatar for user lin_chester
    There are countless special names for angles, but many of these are not important at this level of study. Here are the main ones you should know.
    Acute angle: less than 90°
    Right angle: 90°
    Obtuse angle: between 90° and 180°
    Straight angle: 180°
    Reflex angle: between 180° and 360°
    Perigon angle or Full angle: 360°
    Oblique angle: any angle other than 0° or a multiple of 90°
    Complementary angles: two angles that add up to 90°
    Supplementary angles: two angles that add up to 180°
    Explementary or conjugate angles: two angles that add up to 360°.
    Interior angle (meaning one): the angle inside of a polygon formed by the meeting of two sides.

    Interior angle (meaning two): any of the four angles formed between two lines where a transversal intersects them.

    Exterior angle (meaning one): an angle on the outside of a polygon formed by a side and its extended adjacent side.

    Exterior angle (meaning two): any of the four angles formed by a transversal that are not between the two lines the transversal intersects. In other words, one of the outside four angles a transversal creates.

    Adjacent angles: two angles which share one common side and share a common vertex.

    Vertical angles: the angles on opposite sides of two intersecting lines

    There are a variety of other terms for various kinds of pairings of angles.
    (13 votes)
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  • aqualine tree style avatar for user Ku Yanyi
    How are angles used in everyday life?
    (8 votes)
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    • leaf green style avatar for user jude4A
      You can use them to find distances and heights of other objects. You can also use them to describe the motion of objects with a periodic or predictable pattern such as a child playing on a park swing. There are many more applications than just these.
      (11 votes)
  • starky tree style avatar for user hangap
    I think the protractor is a smart idea.It helps me allot,but who invented the protractor?
    (6 votes)
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    • hopper cool style avatar for user SAAAN
      Hello hangap 🙌

      Here is your answer :-

      Its great that the protractor helps you a lot, It helps me too!!
      A protractor was invented by "Joseph Huddart"

      A little about Joseph Huddart :-
      He was a U.S naval captain meaning, He was the captain of the U.S navy.
      -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Hope this helped!!
      (9 votes)
  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user Lotus
    How do you measure a circle?
    (7 votes)
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  • duskpin tree style avatar for user Midnight the wolf
    How can angles be used in real life?
    (6 votes)
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    • male robot hal style avatar for user Stephen White
      Angles are used in many parts of real life. If someone tells you to go two miles to an intersection and take the left 45 degree turn, you'd need to understand what they meant.

      Beyond that, there are many careers that use angles such as: drafting, architecture, engineering, fire fighting, carpentry, map making, flying, just to name a few.
      (5 votes)
  • starky ultimate style avatar for user ...
    Does the angle have to be 100% accurate or can it just be really close
    (7 votes)
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  • piceratops seedling style avatar for user Paola
    Why does the protractor show 72 but the wright angle is actually 70
    (7 votes)
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Video transcript

This is the video for the measuring angles module because, clearly, at the time that I'm doing this video, there is no video for the measuring angles module. And this is a pretty neat module. This was made by Omar Rizwan, one of our amazing high school interns that we had this past summer. This is the summer of 2011. And what it really is, is it makes you measure angles. And he made this really cool protractor tool here so that you actually use this protractor to measure the angles there. And so the trick here is you would actually measure it the way you would measure any angle using an actual physical protractor. You'd want to put the center of the protractor right at the vertex of where the two lines intersect. You can view it as the vertex of the angle. And then you'd want to rotate it so that, preferably, this edge, this edge at 0 degrees, is at one of these sides. So let's do it so that this edge right over here is right along this line. So let me rotate it. So then-- I've got to rotate it a little bit further, maybe one more. No, that's too far. So that looks about right. And then if you look at it this way, you can see that the angle-- and I don't have my Pen tool here. I'm just using my regular web browser-- if you look at the angle here, you see that the other line goes to 130 degrees. So this angle that we need to measure here is 130 degrees, assuming you can read sideways. So that is 130 degrees. Let me check my answer. Very good, I got it right. It would have been embarrassing if I didn't. Let's do the next question. I'll do a couple of examples like this. So once again, let us put the center of the protractor right at the vertex right over there. And let's get this 0 degrees side to be on one of these sides so that this angle will be within the protractor. So let me rotate it this way. And this really is pretty cool what Omar did with this module. So let's see. Let's do it one more time. That's too far. And so that looks about right. And then you can see that the angle right over here, if we look at where the other line points to, it is 40 degrees. Check answer-- very good. Let's do another one. This is fun. So let's get our protractor right over there. And you don't always have to do it in that same order. You could rotate it first so that the 0 degrees is-- and what you want to do is you want to rotate the 0 degrees to one of the sides so that the angle is still within the protractor. So let's rotate it around. So if you did it like that-- so you don't always have to do it in that same order. Although I think it's easier to rotate it when you have the center of the protractor at the vertex of the angle. So we have to rotate it a little bit more. So 0 degrees is this line. And then as we go further and further up, I guess, since this is on its side, it looks like this other line gets us to 150 degrees. And hopefully you're noticing that the higher the degrees, the more open this angle is. And so this one right over here is 150 degrees. And so let's do that-- 150. Let's do one more. Now let me show you what not to do. So what not to do is-- so you could put the center right over there. And you might say, OK, let me make the 0 go right over on this side, right over here. So if you did that, notice your angle would not be within the protractor. So you won't be able to measure it. And what you're attempting to do is measure this outer angle over here, which is an angle, but that's not the angle that this question is asking us to measure. This little arc over here is telling us that that's the angle that we need to measure. So that arc has to be within the protractor. So let's rotate this protractor a little bit more. I overdid it. And so this looks like this is 0 degrees, and then this right over here is 60 degrees. 60 degrees-- we got that one right, too. So hopefully that helps you with this module. It's kind of fun.