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The SAT Math Test: What to expect

An overview of the SAT Math Test.

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  • blobby green style avatar for user Ayame Castro
    I am taking the actual SAT next week and I have been cramming for it but the math section has overall been my weakest subject and i was wondering what are the best ways to study for it and what kind of tips can I take with me?
    (20 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user wizzyj3756
    Hello,I got 860 on my first attempt writing the SAT last year.I will be writing another one in May and I'd like to boost my score from 860 to 1400.How possible can this be?.My friend's classmate who took the exam last year for the first time got 1260 and he's asking me to use khan academy to help me with my skills.Please I need your reply on how to boost my score because this is my first time using Khan academy
    (5 votes)
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    • blobby green style avatar for user smartypants051800
      To boost your score you need to study--a lot. But to also improve your score, you need to understand how they format the questions--to see what they are looking for. For example, you can look for key words such as: difference, total, amount, sum, etc. This should help you improve your score (along with studying a lot). Most of the problems are algebra, but there are a descent amount of trig and geometry questions in the math section. Hope you do great!
      (18 votes)
  • blobby green style avatar for user mildred adja
    Math is giving me serious problems the questions are really confusing to understand and I'd really like to get a scholarship any tips on how to help my situation
    (8 votes)
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  • duskpin seedling style avatar for user cat
    What's the difference between SAT and ACT math?
    (I live in the state of Mississippi so I have to take the ACT)
    Would taking the SAT instead of the ACT hurt me?
    (2 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Nusrat Jahan
    Must the answers to the grid-in questions always be positive?
    (4 votes)
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    • piceratops ultimate style avatar for user Hecretary Bird
      Yes. Answers to grid-in questions must be positive, must be 4 digits or less, must have 3 or less digits after a decimal point, must not have any 3-digit numbers in the numerator or denominator of a fraction, and a couple other restrictions that arise because of the way that the grid-in questions are set up. If you catch that your answer has one of these, then don't waste the time trying to bubble it in and failing, just take another look and see where you might have missed some detail.
      (1 vote)
  • leafers ultimate style avatar for user narendar.baskaran
    Can we use scientific calculator in calculator section?
    (2 votes)
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  • spunky sam orange style avatar for user Super learner 24
    What is a good way to practice questions you don't know how to do
    (2 votes)
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  • leaf green style avatar for user Prasanthi Kaja
    Can someone tell me where to find practice material or study material for the SAT subject tests because I couldn't find them on KA. Thanks for your help.
    (5 votes)
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  • starky seedling style avatar for user Pettit-Isaiah
    I'm gonna be taking the sat next year but one thing i severely struggle with is math it's not for me. I don't really like math but i'm gonna try to do my best and practice. Hopefully this will help me complete what i struggle with.
    (2 votes)
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  • blobby green style avatar for user Christian Moran
    Am I allowed to use calculator? This would be great!
    (1 vote)
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Video transcript

The SAT consists of tests in Reading, Writing and Language, and Math – plus an optional Essay. This video focuses on the Math test. The SAT math test is designed to align to the math you’re learning in school. Working hard in your math class and applying those math skills to your science and social studies classes will give you the foundation you need for the SAT Math Test. The Math Test has two portions. In the first, you are given 55 minutes to complete 38 questions, and calculators are permitted. This portion includes questions that involve more complex calculations, so using a calculator might allow you to work more efficiently. Some questions, however, might be easier to solve without a calculator. So, it will be up to you to decide whether or not to use one. The second portion of the Math Test has 20 questions, and you will have 25 minutes to complete it. Calculators are not permitted on this section, which tests your fluency with specific mathematical topics and concepts. About 80% of the questions on the Math Test are multiple-choice. The other 20% are gridded response, which can include non-negative integers, fractions, or decimals. A set of reference information is provided at the beginning of the test. You may find these facts and formulas helpful as you answer some of the questions. To do well, you should make sure you get comfortable working with them. The Math Test focuses on three main areas: Questions from the area we call "Heart of Algebra" require you to create, manipulate, and solve algebraic equations. The second area is Problem Solving and Data Analysis, which asks you to use ratios, percentages, and proportional reasoning to solve problems in real-world situations, as well as interpret graphs and tables. The third area — Passport to Advanced Math — requires you to demonstrate familiarity with more complex equations or functions. These are math skills you’ll want to master if you want to pursue a career in science, technology, engineering, or math. A small number of questions on the Math Test fall outside of the three main areas. These questions, Additional Topics in Math, will focus on certain key concepts, including area and volume, coordinate geometry, and basic trigonometry. Throughout the Math Test, some of the questions will be taken from science and social science contexts, in addition to career and other real-life settings. In some cases, you will be presented with one scenario and then asked several questions about it. You’re in the right place to learn more about the SAT Math Test – right here on Khan Academy. So, let’s get started with some free hands-on practice!